jetter2

  • Safe on all pipes

  • Long lasting results

  • Avoids damage from backed-up lines

  • Service scheduled at your convenience

Pipe cleaning is commonly performed by a technique known as sewer jetting. Sewer jetting is the application of streams of high pressure water for use within pipes for cleaning & debris removal. Water at the correct high pressure can cut roots, dissolve blockages, emulsify grease and soaps while spray washing pipe wall surfaces. As part of the jetting process, the water from the nozzle can also wash away accumulated dirt or debris on the bottom of the pipe at the same time.

 

sewerJetting

 

Illustration above shows how high pressure jetting can clean a pipe or remove a pipeline blockage. The concept is the same for a 2, 4, 6″ pipes or an 18″ pipe. Periodic pipe cleaning is required to maintain maximum flow capacity of a pipeline to reduce potential surcharging from accumulated grease or scale buildup.

The majority of pipes that need to be cleaned & maintained and / or potential applications for high pressure jetting units are:

Sanitary or Mainline Sewers – located under streets and roads that connect building laterals to a municipal wastewater treatment plant for treatment. Wastewater flows freely through sewers via gravity. Sewers are connected at various intervals by manholes (maintenance access point) that in some applications will allow for a change of direction of wastewater flow. Municipal sewers can range in size from pipes as small as 6 inches, increasing in diameter as more & more laterals connect to the system. Sewer blockages can form as a result of root infiltration, food grease buildup, soap residue buildup, dirt and debris accumulation. Blockages can also occur from pipe failure or collapse that will require excavation to correct. Private sanitary wastewater collection systems of similar construction can be found on privately owned property connecting buildings in apartment and office complexes, universities or other large campus-type facilities that ultimately discharge into a municipal wastewater systems.

Laterals – Pipes that connect building drainage systems to municipal sewers, considered to be part of the property and the responsibility of the property owner. Typically, laterals are 4″ & 6″ diameter pipes that connect directly to municipal sewer pipelines, but can be larger for commercial or industrial buildings. Lateral blockages can form as a result of root infiltration, food grease buildup, soap residue buildup, dirt and debris accumulation. Blockages can also occur from pipe failure or collapse that will require excavation to correct.

Drains – Drainage pipes are located under or within buildings, considered the be part of the property and the responsibility of the property owner. Drains in buildings can range in sizes from 2″ to 6″ diameters (typically) that normally contain “Tees” or “Elbows” for wastewater directional changes. Drain blockages can form as a result of food grease buildup, soap residue buildup, dirt and debris accumulation.

Storm Drains – pipes that are limited to the collections and control of rainwater. Rainwater can be collected and directly diverted to streams or rivers without passing through a water treatment plant. Storm drain blockages can form as a result of root infiltration, silt, dirt and debris accumulation. Blockages can also occur from pipe failure or collapse that will require excavation to correct.

Process Pipe & Conduits – Pipes of all diameters & lengths used in manufacturing plants, chemical plants & food processing facilities that transports liquids other that sanitary wastewater or rainwater. Blockages in process pipelines can be caused by many factors related to the process, each individual application occurrence will have unique factors to be dealt with on a case by case basis.